The Truth About Comparisons

by in Representative Line on

We often point to dates as one of the example data types which is so complicated that most developers can’t understand them. This is unfair, as pretty much every data type has weird quirks and edge cases which make for unexpected behaviors. Floating point rounding, integer overflows and underflows, various types of string representation…

But file-not-founds excepted, people have to understand Booleans, right?


Placeholders-a-Plenty

by in Error'd on

"On my admittedly old and cheap phone, Google Maps seems to have confused the definition of the word 'trip'," writes Ivan.


A Problematic Place

by in CodeSOD on

In programming, sometimes the ordering of your data matters. And sometimes the ordering doesn’t matter and it can be completely random. And sometimes… well, El Dorko found a case where it apparently matters that it doesn’t matter:

DirectoryInfo di = new DirectoryInfo(directory);
FileInfo[] files = di.GetFiles();
DirectoryInfo[] subdirs = di.GetDirectories();

// shuffle subdirs to avoid problematic places
Random rnd = new Random();
for( int i = subdirs.Length - 1; i > 0; i-- )
{
    int n = rnd.Next( i + 1 );
    DirectoryInfo tmp = subdirs[i];
    subdirs[i] = subdirs[n];
    subdirs[n] = tmp;
}

foreach (DirectoryInfo dir in subdirs)
{
   // process files in directory
}

The Proprietary Format

by in Feature Articles on

Have you ever secured something with a lock? The intent is that at some point in the future, you'll use the requisite key to regain access to it. Of course, the underlying assumption is that you actually have the key. How do you open a lock once you've lost the key? That's when you need to get creative. Lock picks. Bolt cutters. Blow torch. GAU-8...

In 2004, Ben S. went on a solo bicycle tour, and for reasons of weight, his only computer was a Handspring Visor Deluxe PDA running Palm OS. He had an external, folding keyboard that he would use to type his notes from each day of the trip. To keep these notes organized by day, he stored them in the Datebook (calendar) app as all-day events. The PDA would sync with a desktop computer using a Handspring-branded fork of the Palm Desktop software. The whole Datebook could then be exported as a text file from there. As such, Ben figured his notes were safe. After the trip ended, he bought a Windows PC that he had until 2010, but he never quite got around to exporting the text file. After he switched to using a Mac, he copied the files to the Mac and gave away the PC.

Handspring Treo 90

Breaking Changes

by in CodeSOD on

We talk a lot about the sort of wheels one shouldn’t reinvent. Loads of bad code stumbles down that path. Today, Mary sends us some code from their home-grown unit testing framework.

Mary doesn’t have much to say about whatever case of Not Invented Here Syndrome brought things to this point. It’s especially notable that this is Python, which comes, out of the box, with a perfectly serviceable unittest module built in. Apparently not serviceable enough for their team, however, as Burt, the Lead Developer, wrote his own.


All the Things!

by in CodeSOD on

Yasmin needed to fetch some data from a database for a report. Specifically, she needed to get all the order data. All of it. No matter how much there was.

The required query might be long running, but it wouldn’t be complicated. By policy, every query needed to be implemented as a stored procedure. Yasmin, being a smart prograammer, decided to check and see if anybody had already implemented a stored procedure which did what she needed. She found one called GetAllOrders. Perfect! She tested it in her report.


Surgeons, Put Down Your Scalpels

by in Error'd on

"I wonder what events, or lawsuits, lead TP-Link to add this warning presumably targeted individuals who updated firmware just ahead of performing medical procedures," writes Andrew.


To Suffer The Slings and Arrows of Vendor Products…

by in Feature Articles on

Being a software architect is a difficult task. Part of the skill is rote software design based upon the technology of choice. Part of it is the very soft "science" of knowing how much to design to make the software somewhat extensible without going so far as to design/build something that is overkill. An extreme version of this would be the inner platform effect.

A bike with square wheels

Way back when I was a somewhat new developer, I was tasked with adding a fairly large feature that required the addition of a database to our otherwise database-less application. I went to our in-team architect, described the problem, and asked him to request a modest database for us. At the time, Sybase was the in-house tool. He decreed that "Sybase sucks", and that he could build a better database solution himself. He would even make it more functional than Sybase.


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