Remy Porter

Remy is a veteran developer who provides software for architectural installations with IonTank.

He's often on stage, doing improv comedy, but insists that he isn't doing comedy- it's deadly serious. You're laughing at him, not with him. That, by the way, is usually true- you're laughing at him, not with him.

Failure To Process

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Karl supplies us with an unusual bit of code. In the vein of a "true confession", it's code Karl wrote. In the vein of a good WTF, it had to be written like this because of bad choices made earlier in the pipeline.

But the code itself isn't a WTF. It's not good, but… well…


An Utter Mockery

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Today's submitter gave us their name as simply ImminentBurnout. IB works at a company that uses Python and has strong opinions about unit testing. They don't have much understanding to go with those opinions, but they definitely have opinions.

One opinion is that every object- every object must have a stub version to facilitate unit testing. Now, if you're familiar with Python, you know the MagicMock library is built-in in Python 3 and is available as a dependency in 2.7, so problem solved. A MagicMock can act as a stub for every class or method. Plus, it has patching operators to dynamically swap out implementations.


List Incomprehension

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Loads of languages, like Python, have some sort of "comprehension" as a form of syntactic sugar. Instead of doing something awkward like:

my_list = [1, 2, 3, 4]
res = []
for x in my_list:
  res.append(x*x)
# res contains: [1, 4, 9, 16]

Repeat and Rinse

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The challenges of doing a national integration continue to plague Sergio. More specifically, the “solutions” left behind by his predecessors continue to annoy.

Sergio has inherited a system which needs to plug in to a national database. As the national integration was something which was added after the business processes were already determined, that means that certain terms/descriptors/captions/etc. are used internally than are required externally, and vice versa. So, for example, one laboratory test Sergio’s company performs might be called “QD1” internally, but is known by the government as “F3+”.


Newly Singleton

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Shery was brought on to help with a project which was “going well”. “Going well” meant that all the little icons on the project management dashboard were green, which is one of the most effective ways to conceal a project which is struggling.

Shery’s component was large, and it was complicated, and it had a well defined interface to the rest of the application. Specifically, they had a documented JSON message format which her code would receive via JMS. That meant she could do the vast majority of her work in isolation, without talking too much to the existing team, so she did.


A Very Personal Role

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Nohemi has a program which needs to apply role-based security. Due to their organizational needs, the rules for role names are a bit unusual. Some roles have to be a case-insensitive match. But some roles have a more flexible pattern they need to have. This is how her co-worker implemented this:

public static String decodeRole(String role) { String decodedRole = ""; if (role != null && !role.trim().equals("")) { if (role.trim().equalsIgnoreCase(ROLE_1_STRING)) decodedRole = CODE_ROLE_1; else if (role.trim().equalsIgnoreCase(ROLE_2_STRING)) decodedRole = CODE_ROLE_2; else if (role.trim().equalsIgnoreCase(ROLE_3_STRING)) decodedRole = CODE_ROLE_3; else if (personalContains(role.trim(), ROLE_4_STRING)) decodedRole = CODE_ROLE_4; } return decodedRole; }

What Am I?

by in Representative Line on

Object oriented programming is the weapon of choice for many programmers, and when wielded properly, you can often rely on a mix of convention and strong types to make it clear what type of object you’re working with. Sometimes though, you need to check. In a language like Java, you have the instanceof operator, a boolean comparison which answers if obj instanceof SomeClass. Seeing a lot of that in a codebase is a clear code smell.

Sometimes, though, not seeing it is the code smell.


Never Refuse a Fifth

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Sometimes, you want your dates to look like this: 3/3/2019. Other times, you want them to look like this: 03/03/2019.

There are plenty of wrong ways to do this. There are far fewer right ways to do it, and they mostly boil down to “use your language’s date library.”


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