Remy Porter

Remy is a veteran developer who provides software for architectural installations with IonTank.

He's often on stage, doing improv comedy, but insists that he isn't doing comedy- it's deadly serious. You're laughing at him, not with him. That, by the way, is usually true- you're laughing at him, not with him.

Now I Need an Injection

by in CodeSOD on

Frankie was handed a pile of PHP and told, "Move this to a new host." The process didn't go well- simply copying the code to the server chucked out a 500 error. So Frankie started digging into the code.

Like a lot of PHP code, this code wasn't written. It happened. A long chain of revisions, emergency fixes, quick and dirty hacks, and "I dunno what I did, but that fixes it," meant that it was a twisty pile of spaghetti that wasn't drained properly and now is all sort of sticking together into a starch blob that only vaguely resembles the pasta it once was.


Translatováno

by in CodeSOD on

Let’s say you’re a native English speaker. Let’s say you’re writing a library which is going to be used by Czech speakers, like our submitter Jan Krynický. You’ve been told to make sure the code is usuable by them, so you decided to use C#’s annotations to provide Czech documentation of various fields.

There’s just one problem: you don’t know Czech. You know enough to know that the Czech equivalent of “-ed”, as in “uploaded” is “-ováno”, so “uploadováno” seems perfectly reasonable to you. Czech documentation, done. It might not be the best choice, but they'll get the point.


Tern Java Into Python

by in CodeSOD on

Thomas K was browsing around, trying to give folks some technical help. While doing that, he found a poor, belaguered soul who had been given a task: convert some Java code to Python.

This was the code:


Just a Bit Bad

by in CodeSOD on

Eyal N works on some code which relies on "bit matrices": 2D arrays of bits. Since they are working in C, in practice this means that they have one giant array of bytes and methods to handle getting and setting specific entries in the matrix.

One day, Eyal sat down to do a remote pair-programming session with a co-worker. It started out alright, but the hours ticked by, the problem they were dealing with kept showing thornier and thornier edge cases, and instead of calling it a day, they worked late into the night.


An Ugly Mutation

by in CodeSOD on

If there’s a hell for programmers, it probably involves C-style strings on some level. C’s approach to strings is rooted in arrays, and arrays are rooted in pointers, and now suddenly everything is memory manipulation, and incautious printf and memcpy commands cause buffer overruns. I'm oversimplifying and leaving out some of the better libraries that make this less painful, but the roots remain the same.

Fortunately, most of the time, we’re not working with that sort of string representation. If you’re using a high-level language, like Java, you get all sorts of perks, like abstract string methods, no concerns about null termination, and immutability by default.


String Up Your Replacement

by in CodeSOD on

Generating SQL statements is a necessary feature of many applications. String concatenation is the most obvious, and also the most wrong way to do this. Most APIs these days offer a way to construct SQL statements out of higher-level abstractions, whether we’re talking about .NET’s LINQ, or the QueryBuilder objects in many languages.

But let’s say you’re doing string concatenation. This means you need to have lots of literals in your code. And literal values, as we know, are bad. So we need to avoid these magic values by storing them in variables.


A Military Virus

by in Feature Articles on

The virus threats we worried about in the late 90s are quite different than the one we're worrying about in 2020, because someone looked at word processors and said, "You know what that needs? That needs a full fledged programming language I can embed in documents."

Alex was a sailor for the US Navy, fresh out of boot, and working for the Defense Information School. The school taught sailors to be journalists, which meant really learning how to create press releases and other public affairs documents. The IT department was far from mature, and they had just deployed the latest version of Microsoft Word, which created the perfect breeding ground for macro viruses.


Deep VB

by in CodeSOD on

Thomas had an application which was timing out. The code which he sent us has nothing to do with why it was timing out, but it provides a nice illustration of why timeouts and other bugs are a common “feature” of the application.

The codebase contains 9000+ line classes, functions with hundreds of lines, and no concept of separation of function. So, when someone needed to look at an account number and decide if that account needs special handling, this is what they did:


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