Recent CodeSOD

Code Snippet Of the Day (CodeSOD) features interesting and usually incorrect code snippets taken from actual production code in a commercial and/or open source software projects.

Aug 2020

The Concatenator

by in CodeSOD on

In English, there's much debate over the "Oxford Comma": in a list of items, do you put a comma between the penultimate item and the "and" before the final one? For example: "The conference featured bad programmers, Remy and TheDailyWTF readers" versus "The conference featured bad programmers, Remy, and the TheDailyWTF readers."

I'd like to introduce a subtly different one: "the concatenator's comma", or if we want to be generic "the concatenator's seperator character", but that doesn't have the same ring to it. If you're planning to list items as a string, you might to something like this pseudocode:


A Slow Moving Stream

by in CodeSOD on

We’ve talked about Java’s streams in the past. It’s hardly a “new” feature at this point, but its blend of “being really useful” and “based on functional programming techniques” and “different than other APIs” means that we still have developers struggling to figure out how to use it.

Jeff H has a co-worker, Clarence, who is very “anti-stream”. “It creates too many copies of our objects, so it’s terrible for memory, and it’s so much slower. Don’t use streams unless you absolutely have to!” So in many a code review, Jeff submits some very simple, easy to read, and fast-performing bit of stream code, and Clarence objects. “It’s slow. It wastes memory.”


A Private Code Review

by in CodeSOD on

Jessica has worked with some cunning developers in the past. To help cope with some of that “cunning”, they’ve recently gone out searching for new developers.

Now, there were some problems with their job description and salary offer, specifically, they were asking for developers who do too much and get paid too little. Which is how Jessica started working with Blair. Jessica was hoping to staff up her team with some mid-level or junior developers with a background in web development. Instead, she got Blair, a 13+ year veteran who had just started doing web development in the past six months.


A Unique Choice

by in CodeSOD on

There are many ways to mess up doing unique identifiers. It's a hard problem, and that's why we've sorta agreed on a few distinct ways to do it. First, we can just autonumber. Easy, but it doesn't always scale that well, especially in distributed systems. Second, we can use something like UUIDs: mix a few bits of real data in with a big pile of random data, and you can create a unique ID. Finally, there are some hashing-related options, where the data itself generates its ID.

Tiffanie was digging into some weird crashes in a database application, and discovered that their MODULES table couldn't decide which was correct, and opted for two: MODULE_ID, an autonumbered field, and MODULE_UUID, which one would assume, held a UUID. There were also the requsite MODULE_NAME and similar fields. A quick scan of the table looked like:

MODULE_ID MODULE_NAME MODULE_UUID MODULE_DESC
0 Defects 8461aa9b-ba38-4201-a717-cee257b73af0 Defects
1 Test Plan 06fd18eb-8214-4431-aa66-e11ae2a6c9b3 Test Plan